Tennis Grips

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The Continental grip

The Continental grip, also called the Chopper grip or Hammer grip, is obtained when placing the hand such that the base knuckle of the index finger is right on the second bevel. It is naturally obtained when holding the racket as if it were an axe, for chopping. Hence the second name "Chopper grip". The Continental grip is suitable for a variety of shots and therefore is often taught to absolute beginners, so that they should not bother changing grips while learning the basics of the game. The Continental grip does not allow for much topspin on groundstrokes. Since modern tennis, especially clay court tennis, has shown an evolution towards topspin, the Continental grip has gone out of fashion with professional players for hitting groundstrokes. It is still the preferred grip for serves and volleys. The rest of the grips strike a balance between high spin capacity on one hand, and variety and control on the other hand.

The Eastern Forehand grip

The Eastern Forehand grip is obtained when placing the hand such that the base knuckle of the index finger is right on the third bevel. It is naturally obtained when picking up a racquet lying on the ground, or "shaking hands" with a perpendicularly held racquet. The Eastern Forehand grip allows for flat shots on the forehand while making it more difficult to hit topspin, because the shift along the handle is only 45 degrees.

The Eastern Backhand grip

The Eastern Backhand grip is obtained when placing the hand such that the base knuckle of the index finger and heel of the hand are right on the 1st bevel. This is essentially the same as the Western forehand grip and allows for significant spin and control.

The Semi-Western grip

The Semi-Western grip is obtained by placing the hand such that the base knuckle of the index finger is right on the fourth bevel. This racquet grip is popular with baseliners who like to hit with much topspin and a ferocious amount of power. It gets more hand behind the grip, causing shots to result with more ferocity, and provides a contact point much farther out front.

The Western grip

The Western grip, is used by placing the hand such that the base knuckle of the index finger is right on the fifth bevel. Compared to the Continental grip, the blade has rotated 135 degrees. This forces the wrist in an uncomfortable twist but allows for the greatest possible spin.

This is basically equivalent to the Eastern Backhand grip, and the same face of the racquet is used to strike the ball.

The Double-Handed Backhand grip

The basic Two-Handed Backhand grip, is obtained by holding the racquet in a regular Continental grip, then placing the left hand above holding it in a left-handed Eastern Forehand grip. Holding the racquet using two hands for the backhand is very common, but, there are many variations in the precise positioning of the two hands. This also varies between right and left handed players.

 

Continental Grip
Eastern Forehand Grip
Semi Western Forehand Grip
Western Forehand Grip
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